Deutsche Bank DigitalBanking: Chapter four

Access to data anywhere, any time – and for anyone?


Sharing, networking and maximum flexibility – these are central to the dream of a digital society. But however much we enjoy new-found freedom, it can still make us a little uneasy at times. It is about our personal information after all – and about our money.

Imagine you use a digital wallet. What are your biggest concerns?


Arrange the 3 aspects below according to their importance to you.

  • If someone steals my smartphone, they have access to all of my personal data.
  • My data could be hacked during wireless transactions.
  • My provider could sell my personal data.

See what concerns are most important to others

  • Survey results*
  • If someone steals my smartphone, they have access to all of my personal data. (85%)
  • My data could be hacked during wireless transactions. (79%)
  • My provider could sell my personal data. (76%)

* According to the PwC Survey, “Consumer Intelligence Series: Opening the Mobile Wallet”(to the complete study)

Imagine you use a digital wallet. What are your biggest concerns?


Arrange the 3 aspects below according to their importance to you:

  • Your order
  • If someone steals my smartphone, they have access to all of my personal data.
  • My data could be hacked during wireless transactions.
  • My provider could sell my personal data.
  • Survey results*
  • If someone steals my smartphone, they have access to all of my personal data. (85%)
  • My data could be hacked during wireless transactions. (79%)
  • My provider could sell my personal data. (76%)
See what concerns are most important to others

* According to the PwC Survey, “Consumer Intelligence Series: Opening the Mobile Wallet”(to the complete study)

7 questions for Peter Schaar


The former Federal Commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information (BfDI) answers our questions on data protection, spy software, discrimination and the monopolisation of public opinion.


Photo: dpa

1 of 7: One-sided transparency

“Contrary to expectations, today’s information society is primarily transparent in only one direction like a one-way mirror, with transparent users on one side and largely non-transparent, digital power centres on the other.”


See the full question and answer

2 of 7: Insight into decision-making processes

“Transparency can promote democratic mechanisms of participation and co-decision. We need considerably greater insight into procedures, structures and decision-making processes.”


See the full question and answer

3 of 7: Guided data acquisition and monopolisation of public opinion

“Rules are laid down unilaterally without user involvement; and neither do users have any influence on the search results presented to them. Users with merely superficial knowledge of computer technology stand little chance of protecting themselves against such manipulation.”


See the full question and answer

4 of 7: Evaluation of data profiles by companies

“Transparency regarding the creation of profiles, by contrast, is underdeveloped. Citizens and consumers must be much better informed. I consider legislation to that effect to be urgently required.”


See the full question and answer

5 of 7: Data protection and data sovereignty

“Companies doing flourishing business in Europe simply cannot be allowed to ignore the EU data protection laws with which their European competitors have to comply.”


See the full question and answer

6 of 7: Evaluation of data by government authorities

“When democratic states continually ramp up the surveillance of their citizens for perfectly understandable reasons they thereby jeopardise the principles of a democracy in which the rule of law applies.”


See the full question and answer

7 of 7: The age of the information society

“Without data protection, unmonitored spaces for discussion, information and opinion forming and without the transparency of societal decision-making processes the information society would become a nightmare.”


See the full question and answer

JP Rangaswami

“Banking will always be about trust and data is at the core of that trust.“


The bank's Chief Data Officer explains how huge amounts of data can be managed in such a way that clients get exactly the information that really matters to them: “We learn the patterns and then we decide how to make use of those patterns to serve the customer.”

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Last Update: November 2016
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